Cast Iron Pipe Liner

Signs of a Failing Cast Iron System

If your home was built before 1975 your cast iron pipes are close to 50 years old or older. Given that cast-iron pipes are only expected to last approximately 50 years, your plumbing could be at the end of its life expectancy. Cast iron was meant to last between 50-100 years, it can withstand high pressure, and it will not melt or burn. Cast iron was the gold standard for pipes in the early 20th century. However, despite its dependability, structures built in the 1940s or 1950s are reaching the end of their lifespan.

One sign that there is a problem with your cast iron plumbing system is a gurgling sound from your toilets/sinks or the smell of sewer gas. The smell of sewer gas is a sign that there is a broken pipe. The broken pipe is releasing gases into the air that would normally be vented to the outdoors, and these gases are not healthy to have in your home.

Other signs that there is an issue with your old plumbing are: roach/pest infestation (including rats), warped wood floors, water-stained tiles or grout, or water damage to your carpet. If you are experiencing any of these warning signs, your plumbing system is likely failing.

This can create serious problems and potential health hazards for a typical family if these repairs are not completed in a timely manner. With symptoms of the problem including the high potential for mold growth, it is important that you have your cast iron pipes inspected. Fortunately, APT offers FREE cast iron pipe inspections that include video inspection so that you can see what your pipes look like that run underneath your home.

Residential Pipeliner

Over the years, corrosion and rust can form and build up in your cast iron water lines and drain pipe, resulting in cracks, leaks, water flow issues, and creating holes large enough for tree roots to sneak in. This is especially true in older homes. The signs of a plumbing issue include low water pressure, slow draining, odors, water damage to your floors, and possibly pest infestation.

Sadly, pipes can go bad without much warning leaving you with a mess and a smaller bank balance than you had before. The traditional method of sewer replacement has been known to be very disruptive and noisy to you and your neighbors. When plumbing and pipe issues occur, calling a plumber is the first thing you should do.

An expert technician will come to your home and likely perform a camera inspection, which is exactly what it sounds like. A small camera will be fed into the pipeline where the technician will look for broken pipes, root intrusion, corrosion, or any debris that may be compromising the structural integrity of your plumbing.

Drain cleaning is a possible option to help with the plumbing issue, but that would be providing a temporary fix for the problem. The plumber will suggest traditional methods for repairing your old pipes, which could be either pipe repair or replacement of the existing pipe. Pipe repair would consist of locating the cracked or damaged pipe, and simply replacing it with new pipe. It would be the cheaper of the two options.

If the issue is much worse, replacing the entire system would be required. This would result in a big expense and upheaval of your home and lawn. And if you're wondering who is responsible for repairs, it would be the property owner.

Free Video Inspection

If your home was built before 1975 we offer a free video inspection, so you can see the current state of your cast iron system.

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Residential Sewer Lines

Broken Cast Iron Sewer Pipe

When considering the sewer pipes coming to and from your home or commercial property, you need to know the difference between the upper lateral and lower lateral. The upper lateral is part of the sewer line that belongs to the home or other commercial building. The lower lateral is the part that connects to the main sewer in the street. It's normally assumed that the city is responsible for that part, but that would be incorrect.

The property owner is usually liable for repairs to both the upper and lower lateral. However, this varies across the United States. The good news is that what was once a very expensive and destructive process has come a long way. The latest technology is referred to often as trenchless pipe repair.

Trenchless technology has produced a new way to take care of sewer drain or main line repair with a method called Cured In Place Pipe or CIPP. This method uses a special epoxy resin, which enables a “pipe within the existing pipe” to be created. This new technology offers the same strength as new pipe.

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